Superb fairy-wrens with extreme exploration phenotypes respond more strongly to simulated territory intrusions

Autor(en)
Diane Colombelli-Négrel, Andrew C. Katsis, Sonia Kleindorfer
Abstrakt

Individuals can exhibit strong consistencies in behaviours across time and contexts, referred to as animal personalities. Yet studies linking personality differences measured in captivity to ecologically relevant social behaviours in the wild are sparse and contradictory. Here, we used wild superb fairy-wrens, Malurus cyaneus, to investigate whether two personality traits measured in short-term captivity (exploration and aggressiveness) predicted aggressiveness in the wild (measured as territory defence). We first identified behavioural phenotypes within our study population by temporarily capturing adult birds to measure their (1) emergence, activity and sector visits in a novel environment (exploration) and (2) aggression in response to mirror image stimulation (aggressiveness). We later simulated two conspecific intrusions within their territory using playback of vocalizations (female or male chatter song) within their territory, in a pairwise design. Both exploration and breeding status (breeder/dominant versus helper/subordinate) influenced the birds’ response to the simulated intrusions. Dominant individuals and individuals with extreme exploration phenotypes (i.e. fast or slow explorers) responded more strongly to playback compared to helpers or those with intermediate exploration phenotypes, respectively. However, aggressiveness measured in short-term captivity (mirror response) did not correlate with our measure of aggressiveness in the wild (playback response during territory defence). The personality matching of breeding pairs (whether their partner had a matching or mismatching exploration phenotype) also influenced playback response, as pairs with mismatching exploration phenotypes responded more strongly to conspecific intruders than pairs with similar phenotypes. Our results support a growing number of studies showing the importance of animal personalities for response strategies and social behaviours.

Organisation(en)
Department für Verhaltens- und Kognitionsbiologie, Core Facility KLF für Verhaltens- und Kognitionsbiologie
Externe Organisation(en)
Flinders University
Journal
Animal Behaviour
Band
193
Seiten
101-111
Anzahl der Seiten
11
ISSN
0003-3472
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2022.08.015
Publikationsdatum
11-2022
Peer-reviewed
Ja
ÖFOS 2012
106051 Verhaltensbiologie
Schlagwörter
ASJC Scopus Sachgebiete
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Animal Science and Zoology
Link zum Portal
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/de/publications/superb-fairywrens-with-extreme-exploration-phenotypes-respond-more-strongly-to-simulated-territory-intrusions(19b59486-bc7d-4e0e-8073-775d27203529).html