The expensive-tissue hypothesis may help explain brain-size reduction during domestication

Autor(en)
Raffaela Lesch, Kurt Kotrschal, Andrew C. Kitchener, W. Tecumseh Fitch, Alexander Kotrschal
Abstrakt

Morphological traits, such as white patches, floppy ears and curly tails, are ubiquitous in domestic animals and are referred to as the ‘domestication syndrome’. A commonly discussed hypothesis that has the potential to provide a unifying explanation for these traits is the ‘neural crest/domestication syndrome hypothesis’. Although this hypothesis has the potential to explain most traits of the domestication syndrome, it only has an indirect connection to the reduction of brain size, which is a typical trait of domestic animals. We discuss how the expensive-tissue hypothesis might help explain brain-size reduction in domestication.

Organisation(en)
Department für Verhaltens- und Kognitionsbiologie
Externe Organisation(en)
Veterinärmedizinische Universität Wien, National Museums Scotland, Wageningen University and Research Centre
Journal
Communicative & Integrative Biology
Band
15
Seiten
190-192
Anzahl der Seiten
3
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1080/19420889.2022.2101196
Publikationsdatum
08-2022
Peer-reviewed
Ja
ÖFOS 2012
106051 Verhaltensbiologie
Schlagwörter
ASJC Scopus Sachgebiete
Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
Link zum Portal
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/de/publications/the-expensivetissue-hypothesis-may-help-explain-brainsize-reduction-during-domestication(3f1d9d1c-de69-4e0b-bc1f-90c6b278aa0f).html