Nestling behaviour predicts naris deformation in Darwin's finches parasitized by the avian vampire fly

Autor(en)
Andrew C. Katsis, Diane Colombelli-Négrel, Lauren K. Common, Jody A. O'Connor, Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Jefferson García-Loor, Sonia Kleindorfer
Abstrakt

Although in-nest parasitism can reduce the fitness of avian hosts, the severity of these effects may vary with host physiology and behaviour. If certain nestling behaviours are beneficial for resisting parasitism, then selection may favour some behavioural phenotypes over others. Here, we tested whether differences in nestling behaviour mediate the negative effects of parasitism, using small ground finches (Geospiza fuliginosa), on Floreana Island, that had been parasitized by the invasive avian vampire fly (Philornis downsi). We first established, using 4 years of breeding data (2005, 2006, 2010 and 2020), that nestlings exposed to more parasites had larger nares and, among older nestlings only, lower body mass. We then examined, using data from the 2020 season, whether each nestling's behaviour (specifically, its response to human handling) predicted the severity of its naris deformation. When faced with high-intensity parasitism, more responsive nestlings (i.e. those that struggled more during handling) had larger nares compared to more docile nestlings. This suggests that more responsive nestlings suffer greater fitness costs due to parasitism, although we also discuss alternative explanations. Future work should consider the stability and heritability of these nestling behavioural differences and whether parasite-induced selection shapes behavioural variation at the population level.

Organisation(en)
Department für Verhaltens- und Kognitionsbiologie, Core Facility KLF für Verhaltens- und Kognitionsbiologie
Externe Organisation(en)
Flinders University, Government of South Australia, Macquarie University, Independent Researcher
Journal
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Band
134
Seiten
636-649
Anzahl der Seiten
14
ISSN
0024-4066
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blab092
Publikationsdatum
11-2021
Peer-reviewed
Ja
ÖFOS 2012
106051 Verhaltensbiologie
Schlagwörter
ASJC Scopus Sachgebiete
Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Link zum Portal
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/de/publications/nestling-behaviour-predicts-naris-deformation-in-darwins-finches-parasitized-by-the-avian-vampire-fly(6ad9e063-0896-4ae1-a523-567f9975a36f).html